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    the sandbox by Edward Albee

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    ibtihel

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    the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Wed Feb 27, 2008 4:37 pm

    Plot

    Beginning with brightest day, the Young Man is performing calisthenics (which he continues to do until the very end of the play) near a sandbox (or sandpit) at the beach. Mommy and Daddy have brought Grandma all the way out from the city and place her in the sandbox. As Mommy and Daddy wait nearby in some chairs, the Musician plays off and on according to what the other characters instruct him to do. Throughout the play, the Young Man is very pleasant, greeting the other characters with a smile as he says, "Hi!". As Mommy and Daddy cease to acknowledge Grandma while they wait, Grandma reverts from her childish behavior and begins to speak coherently to the audience. Grandma and the Young Man begin to converse with each other. Grandma feels comfortable talking with the Young Man as he treats her like a human being (whereas Mommy and Daddy imply through their actions and dialog that she is more of a chore that they must take care of). While still talking with the Young Man, she reminds someone off-stage that it should be nighttime by now. Once brightest day has become deepest night, Mommy and Daddy hear on-stage rumbling. Acknowledging that the sounds are literally coming from off-stage and not from thunder or breaking waves, Mommy knows that Grandma's death is here. As daylight resumes, Mommy briefly weeps by the sandbox before quickly exiting with Daddy. Although Grandma, who is lying down half buried in sand, has continued to mock the mourning of Mommy and Daddy, she soon realizes that she can no longer move. It is at this moment that the Young Man finally stops performing his calisthenics and approaches Grandma and the sandbox. As he directs her to be still, he reveals that he is the Angel of Death and says, "...I am come for you." Even though he says his line like a real amateur, Grandma compliments him and closes her eyes with a smile.

    ibtihel

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    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Wed Feb 27, 2008 4:41 pm

    THE SANDBOX

    The sandbox by Edward Albee is a play that conveys an underlying message of elderly care, senility and death. The characters of the play each take on a personal outlook and each with a roll in life. The play is hard to understand. Each person has to pull out his or her own meanings.

    Pointing out the dysfunctional family, Edward Albee begins his non-direct approach to the subject of death and burial. The characters Mommy and Daddy are husband and wife they paint a picture of a typical bossy older woman and a submissive husband. “Mommy” has

    . . .
    Her daughter took her in after she married and the grandma lived with them until she died. the chore of caring for her own mother.

    After the Mommy and Daddy place the grandma in the sandbox they just sit and wait for her to die.

    The grandma seems to be old, fragile, senile and difficult to care for. All are connected with getting old, death and burial. The young man lets grandma know her time has come to die. Albee’s silly way of presenting this play, we still see the symbolism of the characters and props in the play. This symbolizes her death and burial. She was married young, raised a family and worked on a farm.

    The young man in the story represents the angel of death. But we are faced to look down memory lane and see what type of life grandma had.

    ibtihel

    Number of posts: 129
    Age: 27
    Localisation: kairouan
    Registration date: 2007-12-03

    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Wed Feb 27, 2008 4:41 pm

    the sandbox
    In reading Edward Albee's "The Sandbox" directly out of the text, it seemed to be a trite and dull play. I was left with feeling after I read the play in the book, that if anything this boring could get published so could I some time in the future. Yet, to see it performed live by my fellow classmates, it revealed much of the dynamics of that family. In being able to see it performed among my classmates; my actual opinion of the play did modify. I was able to be more open and understanding to the message and the actual motivation of the play.

    My original opinion of this play was that if was of a family that was too busy to care about the needs of the elderly grandmother. It had managed to rap itself so tightly in the daily bind not to care about any actual me

    . . .
    It is has some streaks of optimism, because the play makes the assumption that it is possible to communicate with other people. That this society has a problem with how to treat the elderly, how to respect the wealth of knowledge that they have.

    In seeing the play performed live I grew to understand that my original assumption was precise yet, there was more going on than I read. A family that had established itself to a point that having to contend with the grandmother throws the entire situation off. It would be the definition of the song the "Little of Lady from Pasadena" how as we get older we do slow down but grow.

    Also a problem with dealing with the elderly is dealing with the fact that they are closer to death. The roles of parenting have changed the child has now become the parent. It is a family that is dealing with having to cope with an elderly parent. It is a family that is adjusting to the change of a loved one.

    The play is a good example of a family dealing with change and transition. I found the play to be a good look at the current trends in society. It about a family has to cope and re-adjust their lives to manage the new person. The play allows the reader from dark humored perspective understand the pain an anger of old aged. Death is an actual theme that I could tell throughout the play.

    ibtihel

    Number of posts: 129
    Age: 27
    Localisation: kairouan
    Registration date: 2007-12-03

    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Wed Feb 27, 2008 4:46 pm

    The Sandbox
    It’s hard to come up with the correct words to describe this book, so I’ll let the words of the book describe why it had such an emotional impact on my life

    “Certain aspects of their lives I would never understand because in my existence warm houses and freedom from violence and hunger and cockroaches was my due. I had never had reason to expect otherwise. Now as an adult, I’ve learned that others live differently and that this different way of life, to them, was also normal. I could accept the fact, but I could not understand it. I do not believe anyone for whom it is not a living reality can; anyone claiming that extra measure of understanding either lies to himself or is a deluded braggart.” (One Child p. 29)

    I can’t understand why a mother would abandon her daughter on the road or why a father would beat and abuse her. Truthfully, I bet they don’t understand it either. But, it is clear to me that many of the causes of child abuse center on the needs and problems of the parents. I think the society needs to do something about this. In order to prevent other

    ibtihel

    Number of posts: 129
    Age: 27
    Localisation: kairouan
    Registration date: 2007-12-03

    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Wed Feb 27, 2008 4:50 pm

    In The Sandbox, Edward Albee introduces one of America's most dysfunctional families, a grasping, materialistic married couple who stage a perverse seaside idyll destined to end in the demise of the wife's aged mother.

    The American Dream continues the story of The Sandbox's Mommy and Daddy, exploring the hollowness of the American dream and the fallacy of the ideal American family.

    ibtihel

    Number of posts: 129
    Age: 27
    Localisation: kairouan
    Registration date: 2007-12-03

    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Wed Feb 27, 2008 5:21 pm

    Through his one-act play The Sandbox, Edward Albee has extended the allegory; his characters not only exist as symbols, but are more than vaguely aware of themselves as such. As caricatures rather than characters, they maintain a consciousness of their presence on stage as well as the stereotypical rules and emotions they are meant to display. Specifically through Mommy and Daddy's vacuous and immediate shifts to "appropriate" attitudes, Edward Albee issues his value statement. In effect, Shakespeare's assessment that "All the world's a stage,/And all men and women merely players" has been reanalyzed and extended by Albee, culminating in a work which declares the conventional conception of death as affected and contrived.

    Almost deceiving in its straightforwardness is the opening note on Mommy and Daddy and the "pre-senility and vacuity of their characters." Daddy's ensuing questions as to what is to be done, and Mommy's resulting composed answers set in motion the implication of an end-of-life ritual whose spiritual meaning has long since passed away. At one point, Daddy asks Mommy if they should conduct a conversation. Mommy responds, "Well, you can talk, if you want to...if you can think of anything to say...if you can think of anything new." Daddy's rejoinder in the negative establishes early on that his and Mommy's existences, and therefore actions, are hackneyed, artificial, mundane, and devoid of any true, personal meaning.

    By the air of preparation which pervades the play, and by Grandma's death in the end, a connection is made, and The Sand Box is duly noted as Albee's address on custom surrounding the coming of life's passing. The creation of an W W W W W W in which the actors are aware of their presence of stage breaks ground for Albee's take on society's engagement in role-playing. Requesting appropriate background music, and making remarks on lighting, Albee's characters cannot escape discredit regarding the genuine. Similarly, Albee greets the close advance of death with the suitable stereotypes of sudden darkness, violin playing, "a violent off-stage rumble," and Mommy's brief tears.

    Inevitably, the sincerity of Mommy and Daddy has been cast in doubt and all subsequent words and actions bear resemblance to conventions. In a remarkable shift of attitude, Mommy declares to Daddy: "Our long night is over. We must put away our mourning..." They do so by gazing at an inanimate Grandma and casually observing how "It's hard to be sad... she looks... so happy." Mommy's hesitation, and Albee's exclusion of a stage note recommending a serenely content-in-death Grandma, indicate the affected nature of Mommy's statement, and inherently, that of The Sand Box, as a whole.

    ibtihel

    Number of posts: 129
    Age: 27
    Localisation: kairouan
    Registration date: 2007-12-03

    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Wed Feb 27, 2008 5:22 pm

    Biography of Edward Albee (1928-)

    Edward Albee

    Edward Albee was born in Washington, DC on March 12, 1928. When he was two weeks old, baby Edward was adopted by millionaire couple Reed and Frances Albee. The Albees named their son after his paternal grandfather, Edward Franklin Albee, a powerful Vaudeville producer who had made the family fortune as a partner in the Keith-Albee Theater Circuit.

    Young Edward was raised by his adoptive parents in Westchester, New York. Because of his father's and grandfather's involvement in the theatre business, Edward was exposed to theatre and well-known Vaudeville personalities throughout his childhood.

    From early on, Edward's mother Frances tried to groom her son to be a respectable member of New York society. The Albees' affluence meant that Edward's childhood was filled with servants and tutors. The family Rolls Royce took him to afternoon matinees, he took riding lessons, vacationed in Miami in the winter, and learned to sail on Long Island Sound in the summer.

    In 1940, twelve-year-old Edward entered the Lawrenceville School, a prestigious boys' preparatory school. During his high school days, he shocked school officials by writing a three-act sex farce entitled Aliqueen. At the age of fifteen, the Lawrenceville School dismissed Edward for cutting classes. Hoping to inspire some discipline in his wayward son, Reed Albee enrolled Edward at the Valley Forge Military Academy. Within a year, Valley Forge had dismissed Edward as well.

    Ultimately, Edward attended Choate from 1944 to 1946. Even as a teenager, Edward was a prolific writer. In 1945, his poem "Eighteen" was published in the Texas literary magazine Kaleidoscope. His senior year at Choate, Edward's first published play Schism appeared in the school literary magazine.

    After graduating from Choate, Edward enrolled at Trinity College, a small liberal arts school in Hartford, Connecticut. While there Edward irked his mother by associating with artists and intellectuals whom she found objectionable. During his days at Trinity College, Edward gained a modicum of theatre experience - although it was onstage, as an actor, rather than as a writer. During his sophomore year, in 1947, nineteen-year-old Edward was dismissed from yet another school. This time, Trinity College claimed that he had failed to attend Chapel and certain classes.

    Despite his mother's objections, Edward moved to New York City's artsy Greenwich Village at the age of twenty. He supported himself by writing music programming for WNYC radio. In 1953, young Albee met playwright Thornton Wilder. Later, he credited Wilder with inspiring him to become a playwright - advice he did not follow for a few more years. Over the next decade, Albee lived on the proceeds of his grandmother's trust fund and held jobs as an office boy, record salesman, and Western Union messenger.

    In 1958, Albee wrote his first major play, a one-act entitled The Zoo Story. When no New York producer would agree to stage it, Albee sent the play to an old friend in New York. The play was first produced in Berlin. After its success abroad, American theatre producer Alan Schneider agreed to produce The Zoo Story off-Broadway in a double bill with Samuel Beckett's Krapp's Last Tape. This early association with Beckett served to cement Albee's connection to the Theatre of the Absurd. In fact, The Zoo Story was at the time of its production hailed as the birth of American absurdist drama.

    Immediately, Albee became perceived as a leader of a new theatrical movement in America. His success was in part predicated on his ability to straddle the two divergent traditions of American theatre - the traditional and the avant garde, combining the realistic with the surreal . Thus, critics of Albee can rightfully see him as a successor to American playwrights Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, and Eugene O'Neill while at the same time unmistakably influenced by European playwrights like Samuel Beckett and Harold Pinter. Albee has also called Ring Lardner, James Thurber, and Jean Genet important influences on his writing.

    Throughout the following years, Albee strengthened his reputation with a series of one-act plays, including The Death of Bessie Smith and The Sandbox, which he dedicated to his beloved grandmother, in 1960. In 1961, The American Dream dealt with themes that would be drawn upon in Albee's later career. That same year, Albee adapted an unsuccessful production of Melville's short story Bartleby with his friend William Flanagan.

    Despite the success of his original work, Albee's adaptations - Carson McCuller's The Ballad of the Sad Cafe in 1963 and James Purdy's Malcolm in 1965 - have not been critically or popularly successful. Critics described them as being static representations of literary works, simply transplanting existing scenes from the books to the stage.

    Albee's real successes have always come from his original and absurdist dramas. His first three-act drama and the play for which he is best known, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, was produced in New York in 1962. Immediately it became popular and controversial. When its nomination for a Pulitzer was not accepted unanimously by the prize committee, two members of the Pulitzer Prize committee resigned. Nonetheless, the play received the Tony Award and New York Drama Critics Circle Award.

    After the failed McCullers adaptation in 1963, Albee's original drama, a dream play called Tiny Alice, opened in New York. That same year, Albee joined with two friends in creating an absurdist group called "Theater 1964," which produced, among other things, Beckett's Play and Pinter's The Lover at Cherry Lane Theatre. After Malcolm closed after only five days, Albee rebounded with the success of A Delicate Balance in 1966. For this play, he received the Pulitzer Prize.

    Albee continued to write plays throughout the 1960's and 1970's. Everything in the Garden, adapted from a play by Giles Cooper, was produced in 1967, followed by the original plays Box and Quotations from Chairman Mao Tse-Tung in 1968, All Over in 1971, and Seascape in 1975. For Seascape, Albee was awarded a second Pulitzer Prize. Counting the Ways and Listening which initially debuted as a radio play in England was staged in New York in 1977.

    Throughout the 1980's, Albee's playwriting career failed to produce a substantial commercial hit. Plays from this period include The Lady from Dubuque (1980), an adaptation of Lolita (1981), The Man Who Had Three Arms (1983), Finding the Sun (1985), and Marriage Play (1987). During this time, Albee also taught courses at various universities and maintained his residence in New York.

    In 1994, Albee experienced a much-awaited success with the play Three Tall Women. That play earned Albee his third Pulitzer Prize and his first commercial hit in over a decade. Three Tall Women also won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award and the Outer Critics Circle Award. Albee's most recent productions have been Lorca Play in 1993 and Fragments: A Concerto Grosso in 1995.

    Edward Albee is a member of the Dramatists Guild Council and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He teaches courses in playwriting every spring at the University of Houston, the venue where Lorca Play was initially staged. Albee himself sums up his career thus: "I have been both overpraised and underpraised. I assume by the time I finish writing - and I plan to go on writing until I'm ninety or gaga - it will all equal itself out. You can't involve yourself with the vicissitudes of fashion or critical response."

    laflouf86

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    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by laflouf86 on Wed Feb 27, 2008 5:32 pm

    Good job Ibtihel
    Keep on doing so please!!!!

    ibtihel

    Number of posts: 129
    Age: 27
    Localisation: kairouan
    Registration date: 2007-12-03

    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Wed Feb 27, 2008 5:34 pm

    thanks olfa it is kind of you

    ibtihel

    Number of posts: 129
    Age: 27
    Localisation: kairouan
    Registration date: 2007-12-03

    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Tue Mar 04, 2008 3:24 pm

    The Sand Box

    Canndice Green English 102 November 29, 1999 In reading Edward Albee's The Sandbox directly out of the text, it seemed to be a trite and dull play. I was left with feeling after I read the play in the book, that if anything this boring could get published so could I some time in the future. Yet, to see it performed live by my fellow classmates, it revealed much of the dynamics of that family. In being able to see it performed among my classmates; my actual opinion of the play did modify. I was able to be more open and understanding to the message and the actual motivation of the play. My original opinion of this play was that if was of a family that was too busy to care about the needs of the elderly grandmother. It had managed to rap itself so tightly in the daily bind not to care about any actual member of the family that could be sick or aging. A family that had established itself to a point that having to contend with the grandmother throws the entire situation off. In seeing the play performed live I grew to understand that my original assumption was precise yet, there was more going on than I read. It is a family that is dealing with having to cope with an elderly parent. The roles of parenting have changed the child has now become the parent. It about a family has to cope and re-adjust their lives to manage the new person. Also a problem with dealing with the elderly is dealing with the fact that they are closer to death. The realities that the Mom would be losing her own mother soon, which leaves some harsh feelings. Death is an actual theme that I could tell throughout the play. The play confronts being alive and how to behave with the awareness of death. It calls the reader and the people who will view the play live, not to live in fear of death that it is such a natural next step of life. It is has some streaks of optimism, because the play makes the assumption that it is possible to communicate with other people. That in the end the natural element that makes life a workable situation is to be able to talk to each other. The play is a good example of a family dealing with change and transition. It is a family that is adjusting to the change of a loved one. The play allows the reader from dark humored perspective understand the pain an anger of old aged. It would be the definition of the song the Little of Lady from Pasadena how as we get older we do slow down but grow. I found the play to be a good look at the current trends in society. That this society has a problem with how to treat the elderly, how to respect the wealth of knowledge that they have. This society has a function to serve the young and when the elderly hit a certain point they have used the potential and a discarded. The play reflects modern trends on the elderly and the perspective of how they are dealt with.

    ibtihel

    Number of posts: 129
    Age: 27
    Localisation: kairouan
    Registration date: 2007-12-03

    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Tue Mar 04, 2008 3:26 pm

    Edward Albee , 1928-, American playwright, one of the leading dramatists of his generation, b. Washington, D.C. Much of his most characteristic work constitutes an absurdist commentary on American life. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf (1962, film 1966), a Tony Award-winner that is generally regarded as his finest play, presents an all-night drinking bout in which a middle-aged professor and his wife verbally lacerate each other in brilliant colloquial language. His major early plays include The Zoo Story (1959), The Death of Bessie Smith (1960), The Sandbox (1960), The Ballad of the Sad Cafe (1963), adapted from the novel by Carson McCullers , and Tiny Alice (1965). Albee won the Pulitzer Prize for A Delicate Balance (1967), Seascape (1975), and Three Tall Women (1994). Other later plays include The Lady from Dubuque (1980), Marriage Play (1987), and The Play about the Baby (1998). In 2002 two new Albee plays debuted, The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?, a Tony Award-winning family tragicomedy, and Occupant, a portrait of the artist Louise Nevelson .

    ibtihel

    Number of posts: 129
    Age: 27
    Localisation: kairouan
    Registration date: 2007-12-03

    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Tue Mar 04, 2008 3:31 pm

    The Sandbox by Edward Albee

    The story in The Sandbox by Edward Albee, unfolds in an interesting, atypical way. It begins with Daddy and Mommy walking onto a mostly bare stage that has only a sandbox and a young man in the corner who is stretching. Next Grandma enters, babbling like a small baby. She is placed in the sandbox by Mommy and she begins to speak incoherently. A musician is called onstage to play a clarinet. In between these scenes, Mommy and Daddy discuss

    . . .
    They begin to really ignore her and in between she converses with the young man doing calisthenics in the corner. He eventually takes her away to death. The music, symbolizing her life, ends. The sandbox never again opened, and they never saw her again. Grandma’s babbling and incapacitated state is meant to show the innocent incapable state of the newborn and the elderly alike. He symbolizes death, as is proven by his words in his conversations with the old woman. Mommy and Daddy ignore her, as many people do when they don’t want to deal with their elderly parents or young children. They had taken for granted everything she meant to them. They had spent their time and money on themselves, denying her everything she needed and wanted. The musician plays a song throughout; a song that Mommy and Daddy often hush. The young man in the corner stretches and talks to the old woman.

    The large sandbox in the middle is meant to symbolize a coffin and its permanent nature of keeping someone inside. In the end, when the young man takes Grandma away from Mommy and Daddy, there is unspoken death.

    Common topics in this essay:

    ibtihel

    Number of posts: 129
    Age: 27
    Localisation: kairouan
    Registration date: 2007-12-03

    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Tue Mar 04, 2008 3:31 pm

    The Sandbox
    THE SANDBOX

    The sandbox by Edward Albee is a play that conveys an underlying message of elderly care, senility and death. The characters of the play each take on a personal outlook and each with a roll in life. The play is hard to understand. Each person has to pull out his or her own meanings.

    Pointing out the dysfunctional family, Edward Albee begins his non-direct approach to the subject of death and burial. The characters Mommy and Daddy are husband and wife they paint a picture of a typical bossy older woman and a submissive husband. “Mommy” has

    . . .
    Her daughter took her in after she married and the grandma lived with them until she died. the chore of caring for her own mother.

    After the Mommy and Daddy place the grandma in the sandbox they just sit and wait for her to die.

    The grandma seems to be old, fragile, senile and difficult to care for. All are connected with getting old, death and burial. The young man lets grandma know her time has come to die. Albee’s silly way of presenting this play, we still see the symbolism of the characters and props in the play. This symbolizes her death and burial. She was married young, raised a family and worked on a farm.

    The young man in the story represents the angel of death. But we are faced to look down memory lane and see what type of life grandma had.

    ibtihel

    Number of posts: 129
    Age: 27
    Localisation: kairouan
    Registration date: 2007-12-03

    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Tue Mar 04, 2008 3:32 pm

    the sandbox
    In reading Edward Albee's "The Sandbox" directly out of the text, it seemed to be a trite and dull play. I was left with feeling after I read the play in the book, that if anything this boring could get published so could I some time in the future. Yet, to see it performed live by my fellow classmates, it revealed much of the dynamics of that family. In being able to see it performed among my classmates; my actual opinion of the play did modify. I was able to be more open and understanding to the message and the actual motivation of the play.

    My original opinion of this play was that if was of a family that was too busy to care about the needs of the elderly grandmother. It had managed to rap itself so tightly in the daily bind not to care about any actual me

    . . .
    It is has some streaks of optimism, because the play makes the assumption that it is possible to communicate with other people. That this society has a problem with how to treat the elderly, how to respect the wealth of knowledge that they have.

    In seeing the play performed live I grew to understand that my original assumption was precise yet, there was more going on than I read. A family that had established itself to a point that having to contend with the grandmother throws the entire situation off. It would be the definition of the song the "Little of Lady from Pasadena" how as we get older we do slow down but grow.

    Also a problem with dealing with the elderly is dealing with the fact that they are closer to death. The roles of parenting have changed the child has now become the parent. It is a family that is dealing with having to cope with an elderly parent. It is a family that is adjusting to the change of a loved one.

    The play is a good example of a family dealing with change and transition. I found the play to be a good look at the current trends in society. It about a family has to cope and re-adjust their lives to manage the new person. The play allows the reader from dark humored perspective understand the pain an anger of old aged. Death is an actual theme that I could tell throughout the play.

    ibtihel

    Number of posts: 129
    Age: 27
    Localisation: kairouan
    Registration date: 2007-12-03

    Re: the sandbox by Edward Albee

    Post by ibtihel on Tue Mar 04, 2008 3:32 pm

    Edward Albee
    In his play, “The Sandbox,” Edward Albee expresses his feelings of disappointment regarding the way our society treats the elderly. Albee cleverly conveys his ideas and opinions in the form of an allegory. After reading the play once through, it seems humorous and almost silly if you picture the literal meaning of the grandmother being thrown into the sandbox with a toy shovel, a young man doing calisthenics, and the emotionless bickering between Mommy and Daddy. However, after looking closer at the play, one finds deeper and more depressing meaning in this bizarre drama. Albee portrays Mommy and Daddy as self-involved and selfish people who cannot be bothered with Grandmother. Mommy is the most dominant of the pair and finds it to be second nature to direct Daddy and take charge of their actions. Grandma seems to be at the mercy of Mommy and Daddy and sarcastically relays the story of how poorly she is treated.

    At the beginning of the play, we get a taste of the unusual relationship between Mommy and Daddy. Immediately, one may think that the names “Mommy” and “Daddy” suggest that they have kids of their own. However, after reading the play my feeling was that Mommy and Daddy did not fully understand the parent/child

    . . .
    Mommy does not hesitate to take charge as she cries out, “Let’s get on with it” (p. Mommy attempts, again, to dismiss her guilty conscience saying that it is “hard to be sad… she looks… so happy” (p. 35), and tends to boss Daddy around by reminding him that it is “Whatever I (she) say” (p.

    It is clear, in the beginning of the play that Mommy and especially Daddy want to get the funeral over with. 36) and tries to grab attention by screaming, “GRAAAA!” (p. When the supposed time has come for Grandma, Daddy says that they’ve got to be brave and Grandma laughs, mocking the suggested notion that they will really be affected by Grandma’s death. Also, when Grandma tells the Young Man to not go away and he responds “Oh, no” this implies that the Angel of Death is taking Grandma this time without a doubt (p. Of course, by now, it is obvious that Grandma is dead. Perhaps, we, as a society, should think twice before we choose to ignore our conscience and spend more of our efforts in expressing compassion like Grandma at the end of the play as she softly remarks, “You’re… you’re welcome… dear. He convinces me of this notion through his allegory approach. relationship as they lacked the compassion typical of a parent and, therefore, likely did not have kids.

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